Cheapest supermarket revealed in annual Which? survey

ALDI has topped the charts as Britain’s cheapest and favourite in-store supermarket, an annual Which? survey has revealed.

Brits gave the German discount supermarket five stars for value for money – the only grocer in the country to be given this top rating.

It beat rival Lidl, who came in close behind with four stars, as well as eight other stores.

Tesco, Morrisons and Iceland came in joint third place with three stars, while Marks & Spencers, Waitrose, Sainsbury’s and Asda were all given two stars.

Co-op came in last with one star.

Over 3,000 Brits took part in the survey, and Aldi was also top of the leaderboard overall for its instore shopping experience.

How to cut the cost of your grocery shop

SAVING on your shop can make a big difference to your wallet. Here are some tips from comparison site Money.co.uk about how you can cut the cost of your shopping bills:

  • Write yourself a list – Only buy items that you need. If it isn’t on your list, don’t put it in the trolley
  • Create a budget – Work out a weekly budget for your food shopping
  • Never shop hungry – you are far more likely to buy more food if your tummy is rumbling
  • Don’t buy pre-chopped veggies or fruit – The extra they’ll charge for chopping can be eye watering
  • Use social media – follow your favourite retailers to find out about the latest deals
  • Be disloyal – You may want to go to different stores to find the best bargains
  • Check the small print –  It’s always worth checking the price per kg/lb/litre when comparing offers so you’re making a like for like decision as a bigger box won’t necessarily mean you get more
  • Use your loyalty cards – Don’t be afraid to sign up to them all. They all work slightly differently – work out what bonus suits you better and remember to trade in your points for additional rewards

Around 73% of customers said they were satisfied with their shopping trip at Aldi.

For this category, supermarkets were judged on factors including their appearance, layout, queuing times, customer service and range of items.

Marks & Spencer came in second place with 71%, and Lidl, Tesco and Waitrose came in joint third place with 67%.

Co-op came in bottom place with 59%, followed by Asda with 62%.

However, Aldi didn’t perform well in other areas. 

It was voted to have the poorest store appearance with two stars, alongside Lidl, Iceland and Co-op.

Meanwhile, Sainsbury’s was first place overall for its online shopping experience, with a score of 71% for customer satisfaction.

Amazon Fresh and Iceland came in joint second place with 69%, followed by Tesco with 68%.

Asda came bottom with 63%, followed by Waitrose, Ocado, and Morrisons who all scored 64%.

Aldi UK managing director of buying Jule Ashfield said: “We know that demand for great quality products at unbeatable prices has never been higher. 

“That is why we are investing in Britain by opening new stores and creating new ways to shop with us.”

The Sun also ranked the wages of the UK’s biggest supermarkets earlier this month.

Morrisons came in first place, as staff on minimum wage are due to be paid the most – £10 an hour – from April.

Aldi came in second place, paying staff on minimum wage from £9.55 an hour, followed by Lidl, who will be paying from £9.50 an hour in March.

Iceland came bottom of the list, paying frontline shop workers a basic hourly wage from £8.72.

Brits who shop at their local supermarket's local branches are paying up to £320 more a year than those who shop at larger stores.

Families will be able to get an extra £2 worth of free food on their weekly shop when they spend their Healthy Start vouchers at Sainsbury's.

Shoppers have been urged to touch only what they're going to buy in supermarkets to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

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