Petrol stations with fuel near me – Still 'HORRENDOUS' shortages in London & South East with Tesco, Sainsburys, Asda hit

THE fuel crisis in the South East has been blasted as “absolutely horrendous” by experts – as the Army begins driving tankers to deliver petrol.

Countless pumps are still running on empty nation-wide, with the fuel crisis a serious issue in London and the South East, according to the Petrol Retailers Association (PRA).

Now, nearly 200 soldiers are delivering fuel in a bid to end the crisis after going through a crash HGV course.

Read our energy companies live blog for live updates on the crisis…

  • Joseph Gamp

    Most of country sees 'marked improvement' from military help

    The military is helping to deliver fuel to forecourts as a body representing petrol retailers described a "marked improvement" in the situation across most of the country.

    London and the South East have only see a "marginal" improvement, with these areas still facing a "challenging" time, the Petrol Retailers Association (PRA) said.

    The organisation said its survey of a quarter of all independent petrol stations in Great Britain on Monday morning showed that around a fifth of these sites around London and the South East remained without fuel.

    When it comes to the rest of the country that figure was 8%, said the PRA, adding that 86% of sites surveyed have both petrol and diesel available.

    The association represents independent forecourts across the UK and works with around 80% of all motorway services areas.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Woman's frustration after losing £1000 from fuel crisis

    Lucille Whiting, 39, from Kedington, Suffolk, said she missed a hospital appointment on Saturday and could not take her five children to school last week because she was unable to get any diesel.

    She said: "I had a scan booked at my local hospital on Saturday, but that would have been 34 miles – I couldn't get to that and get the kids to school this week. I've also had to cancel work appointments. I'm self-employed and visit clients on an ad hoc basis. That's going to be extremely problematic in the coming weeks."

    Ms Whiting, who is a goldsmith at Sophia Alexander Jewellery – which specialises in making memorial jewellery, explained that her job requires her to "take fingerprints from people who are in the late stages of their conditions or go to funeral directors to see people who have passed".

    She added: "[I've cancelled four work appointments] in the last week, but I make high-ticket pieces so it's potentially over £1000 already.

    "Unfortunately, I've been ill on and off with Covid-related symptoms since April 2020 and one of my sons had problems with heart pain and his breathing for just over a year. It's annihilated the best part of 18 months and I'm finally getting back on my feet work-wise so this is frustrating."

  • Joseph Gamp

    Drivers frustrated over losing money due to shortages

    People have expressed their frustration over losing money and missing hospital appointments as fuel shortages continue.

    The Petrol Retailers Association (PRA) said while the Army have been called in to help deliver fuel to forecourts and there is a "marked improvement" in the situation across most of the country, London and the South East have only seen a marginal" improvement.

    Peter Atkins, 55, a driving instructor from Northfleet, told the PA news agency he has cancelled about five lessons, which cost nearly £60 each.

    He said: "I don't know why people are being the way they are. It's getting beyond a joke – cancelling lessons and moving lessons and having extra hours on people's lessons.

    "I went out yesterday to get some petrol for this week and couldn't find any. I'm losing money and it's getting beyond a joke."

  • Joseph Gamp

    Survey: Doctors fear disruptions due to fuel shortages

    Almost three-quarters of doctors in London and the South East fear they will have major problems refuelling their cars in the coming weeks, while half in the capital think there will be staff absences as a result, a survey has suggested.

    The British Medical Association (BMA) is urging the Government to give essential and emergency workers easier access to fuel.

    The doctors' union said medics had told it their services will be disrupted as a result of lack of access to fuel.

    The BMA surveyed 2,084 doctors in England between October 1 and 4.

    It said 74% of doctors in London and 72% of respondents in the South East think they will have major problems refuelling their car in the next few weeks.

    This compares to 26% in North East and Yorkshire and 32% in North West.

    The survey results showed 50% of doctors in London think that staff absences will occur next week.

    Almost two-thirds (65%) of doctors in London felt that staff might arrive late due to bus delays because of queuing traffic around petrol stations. The figure for the North East and Yorkshire was 28%, according to the survey.

  • Joseph Gamp

    PM: Shortages caused by 'demand not supply'

    The PM this morning said petrol shortages are caused by "demand, not supply" at the pumps, and said he had heard the situation was improving.

    The Prime Minister told LBC: "I sympathise very much with the frustrations of people who have been queueing for petrol. I really, really do. I understand how infuriating it is when you can't get petrol at the pumps, but I must repeat that this has overwhelmingly been a problem of demand, not supply."

    Mr Johnson added: "What I am getting at is that the tanker drivers, the lorry drivers, they have got more than the average week's supply to the pumps for the last few days, and that is the situation."

    He continued: "I think even the Petrol Retailers Association have been saying that the situation has been improving markedly.

    "What you are seeing is the UK economy coming back into life, really sort of stretching its legs, starting to move again, and of course there's been a bit of creaking here and there because we haven't had such activity in a long time."

  • Joseph Gamp

    PM: 127 drivers applied for fuel tanker visas

    Boris Johnson has said 127 drivers have applied for fuel trucker visas amid an acute shortage of drivers.

    The PM told BBC that the haulage industry had been asked to provide the details of drivers who were willing to come to Britain, and it had only given 127 names.

    "What that shows is the global shortage," he said.

    The Times newspaper reported that just 27 fuel tanker drivers had applied.

    With fuel companies and supermarkets warning that a shortage of drivers was hitting deliveries, the government said late last month that it would temporarily reverse its immigration rules and give 5,000 visas for EU drivers to operate in Britain. It said 300 of those could arrive immediately to drive oil tankers.

  • Joseph Gamp

    PM’s popularity rocked by ‘woeful’ handling of crisis

    BORIS Johnson’s popularity has been rocked by the Government’s “woeful” handling of the fuel shortage, a poll revealed.

    Nearly one in five who voted Tory in 2019 say it has made them less likely to back him next time.

    Most think the PM is a strong leader but many are dissatisfied with his overall performance.

    More than a third of Tory voters — 36 per cent — blame the Government for the shortage of lorry drivers and fuel, according to a survey by Redfield and Wilton Strategies.

    More than half are unhappy at his failure to halt migrants crossing the Channel and 42 per cent are unhappy with the response to disruption by Insulate Britain protests.

  • Joseph Gamp

    …but your boss could insist that you use public transport

    However, your employer could insist that you use public transport , although some workers might want to avoid this because of Covid concerns, particularly if they’re vulnerable.

    Rebecca Thornley-Gibson, partner at law firm DMH Stallard, said: “It will be potentially unreasonable to insist that an employee uses public transport to get to work where they have raised genuine health and safety concerns, but that does not mean an employer will have to pay an employee who does not attend work due to the transport difficulties.”

    You could also ask to change your start and finish time so you’re travelling when the roads and petrol stations are hopefully less busy or when public transport is less crowded. Alternatively, your boss could also ask you to travel to a different office location if there is one that is more accessible.

    You may be able to negotiate working from home if you have a job that can be done remotely. If you’ve worked remotely through the pandemic then you should have a strong case for requesting this.

    Thornley Gibson said: “”Employers who have a hybrid working model will see its advantages when employees are prevented from getting to work due to circumstances outside their control. The current [fuel] crisis can be added to the business continuity plans of bad weather, terrorist attacks and public transport strikes.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    Your rights if you can’t get into work due to petrol crisis

    The ongoing petrol crisis has left many drivers unable to fill up and worried about getting to work.

    Widespread panic buying coupled with a shortage of delivery drivers has led to several petrol stations running dry or limiting the amount of fuel customers can get.

    And now, Boris Johnson has confirmed that the interruption could last until Christmas if not longer.

    But if you can’t get into work because you’re out of petrol, what are you rights? Here we explain everything you need to know. The good news is that you can’t be fired if you can’t get to work because of the petrol crisis.

    If your employer does try to sack you because you can’t travel, you should speak to an employment lawyer to see if you have a case for unfair dismissal.

  • Joseph Gamp

    PM refuses to ‘pull lever marked uncontrolled immigration’

    As well as an estimated shortfall of 100,000 HGV drivers, businesses from meat producers to retailers have warned of empty shelves if the shortages are not addressed.

    Mr Johnson acknowledged the country is going through a “period of adjustment” following Brexit, which has cut off the supply of labour from the EU.

    But he insisted he is not prepared to resolve the situation by pulling “the big lever marked uncontrolled immigration” to let in more foreign workers.

    He said firms should ensure their employees are “decently paid” if they want to get more staff.

    The Prime Minister also spoke about the supply chain issues as he visited a Network Rail site in Manchester with Mr Sunak on Monday morning.

    “That’s really a function of the world economy, particularly the UK economy, coming back to life after Covid, sucking in gas in particular – there is a massive demand for that in Asia,” he said.

    “There is a shortage of lorry drivers actually around the world, from Poland to the United States, and even in China they are short of lorry drivers.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    Mum gives birth at petrol forecourt (continued…)

    The drama started when Stephanie woke in the middle of the night with pain and knew her baby was coming.

    She phoned the midwife who had been booked to deliver the baby at 8am but Stephanie told her she needed to come over now as Lucy was on her way.

    Stephanie told the Chronicle Live: “We were going to the hospital with my partner driving, the midwife in the front and me on all fours in the back of our pick-up. There’s no gas and air in the back of a truck.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Mum, 29, gives birth at petrol forecourt ‘in seconds’

    A MUM gave birth “in seconds” on the back of a pick-up truck at a petrol forecourt as she was being rushed to hospital.

    Stephanie Richardson, 29, delivered her third child Lucy Varley in the early hours of Friday morning at the Jet petrol station in Lanchester, County Durham.

    Currently, large parts of the country are in the grip of fuel chaos with many petrol stations being forced to close as they await deliveries.

    The mum, from Medomsley near Consett, had been due to be induced just four hours later but baby Lucy had other ideas and made an appearance in the back of a Nissan pick-up truck instead.

    Fortunately, Stephanie’s partner Matthew Varley, also 29, and their friend and midwife were on hand to ensure Lucy was delivered safely, weighing 6lb 15oz.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Don’t panic

    Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said on September 26 there is “no shortage of fuel” in Britain and “people should be sensible” and fill up only when they need to.

    While there is plenty of fuel, there are not enough HGV drivers to transport it due to a mix of European drivers returning home after Brexit, the pandemic and some professionals retiring.

    Experts estimate the nation faces a shortfall of 100,000 drivers. Nearly 200 soldiers have stepped in to help with petrol deliveries to alleviate the crisis.

    Meanwhile, letters inviting all HGV licence holders back into the profession have been sent out to a million Brits amid widespread disruption at pumps.

    Ministers said they expected the situation to improve further, with the first troops driving tankers expected to appear on the roads from today.

    Over the summer, The Sun launched a campaign to help recruit thousands of HGV drivers.

    Motorists are wanted to help ease Britain’s lorry driver shortage and help put the wheels in motion for a new life on the road.

    See how you can check individual station opening times online before you make the journey as these vary across the country.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Fuel crisis affecting London & South-East

    Brian Madderson, chairman of the Petrol Retailers Association, said the fuel crisis is predominantly affecting London and the South-East.

    Mr Madderson said there were only “one or two dry sites” north of London and that the “general improvement has continued”, but that the situation in London and the South-East remained difficult.

    Speaking to Sky News, he said: “It’s all really to do with the population, we have 25 million-plus living in and around London [and the] home counties.”

    He said it was one of the world’s greatest metropolitan areas “and, of course, to go with that we have a massive amount of delivery vans, a massive amount of vehicles, and that is just the chronic situation”.

  • Joseph Gamp

    It could be ‘a week or so’ before pumps return to normal

    Earlier policing minister Kit Malthouse warned that it could be a “week or so” before the situation at the petrol pumps returned to normal.

    With long queues continuing in some parts of the country – particularly London and the South East – he said they needed to see some improvement over the coming days.

    “I think if things started to deteriorate further, obviously the Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for Energy (Kwasi Kwarteng), whose responsibility this is, will have to review the situation,” he told the BBC.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Operation Escalin begins

    ARMY drivers have started delivering fuel today to Britain’s forecourts – as Boris Johnson warns disruption could last until Christmas.

    Troops have hit the roads for the first time as part of Operation Escalin.

    The PM said it was simply a precaution and there were signs the crisis was abating.

  • Joseph Gamp

    ‘Distinct lack of choice’

    Experts have warned there will be a “distinct lack of choice” on supermarket shelves with some festive favourites likely to be in short supply.

    Industry insiders have warned the fallout from a week of major disruption could take a month or more to fully repair.

    And now some of Britain’s biggest retailers are sounding the alarm about supplies of goods coming into the country for Christmas.

    Clive Black, a retail analyst at Shore Capital, told The Times he expects the festive season to be “a nightmare for consumers”. He said: “There will be food on supermarket shelves but there will be a distinct lack of choice. Shortages of labour have meant businesses have not laid down the same number of turkeys or planted the same number of crops.

    “And the HGV driver shortage is compounding the problem. A lot of people eating on Christmas Day will be asking ‘what the hell is this?’ It won’t be traditional.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    What the Government is doing to combat the crisis

    The Government has agreed to grant 5,000 temporary visas to lorry drivers and a further 5,000 to ­poultry workers to try to address shortages in those industries.

    Army personnel were seen in combat fatigues at a storage depot in Hemel Hempstead today as they filled up tankers ahead of setting off around the country.

    Around 200 members of The Army, who were put on standby last week, will initially focus on the hardest-hit areas.

    They include members of 3rd Logistic Support Regiment who have been in training with the petroleum industry logistics company Hoyers in Thurrock, Essex.

  • Joseph Gamp

    PM rejects calls for more EU tanker driver visas

    Mr Johnson again rejected calls for more European tanker driver visas while more Brits are trained to replace cheap labour after Brexit.

    He insisted: “The way forward for our country is not to just pull the big lever marked ‘uncontrolled immigration’ and allow in huge numbers of people.”

    But he warned of empty shelves in the run-up to Christmas with the economy in a period of transition.

    He was pressed in a BBC interview about a warning by Chancellor Rishi Sunak that problems in the global supply chain meant shortages could hit the festive season.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Can you store fuel at home?

    The legal limit for at-home petrol storage without a special license currently stands at 30 litres.

    However, there are no specific legal demands to store diesel at home, as long as the liquid is stored in the correct container.

    Brits are allowed to keep up to 10 litres in a plastic container, up to 20 litres in a metal “jerry” can, and up to 30 litres in a demountable fuel tank, according to the RAC.

    If stored in a sealed container at 20 degrees, petrol has a shelf-life of around six months.

    However, the shelf-life plunges to just three months of the petrol container is kept at 30 degrees.

  • Louis Allwood

    Your rights if you can’t get into work due to petrol crisis

    The ongoing petrol crisis has left many drivers unable to fill up and worried about getting to work.

    Widespread panic buying coupled with a shortage of delivery drivers has led to several petrol stations running dry or limiting the amount of fuel customers can get.

    And now, Boris Johnson has confirmed that the interruption could last until Christmas if not longer.

    But if you can’t get into work because you’re out of petrol, what are you rights? Here we explain everything you need to know. The good news is that you can’t be fired if you can’t get to work because of the petrol crisis.

    If your employer does try to sack you because you can’t travel, you should speak to an employment lawyer to see if you have a case for unfair dismissal.

  • Louis Allwood

    PM’s popularity rocked by ‘woeful’ handling of crisis

    BORIS Johnson’s popularity has been rocked by the Government’s “woeful” handling of the fuel shortage, a poll revealed.

    Nearly one in five who voted Tory in 2019 say it has made them less likely to back him next time.

    Most think the PM is a strong leader but many are dissatisfied with his overall performance.

    More than a third of Tory voters — 36 per cent — blame the Government for the shortage of lorry drivers and fuel, according to a survey by Redfield and Wilton Strategies.

    More than half are unhappy at his failure to halt migrants crossing the Channel and 42 per cent are unhappy with the response to disruption by Insulate Britain protests.

  • Louis Allwood

    Fuel crisis in South East is still ‘absolutely horrendous’

    THE fuel crisis in the South East has been blasted as “absolutely horrendous” by experts – as the Army begins driving tankers to deliver petrol.

    Countless pumps are still running on empty nation-wide, with the fuel crisis a serious issue in London and the South East, according to the Petrol Retailers Association (PRA).

    Now, nearly 200 soldiers are delivering fuel in a bid to end the crisis after going through a crash HGV course.

    Read more here.

  • Louis Allwood

    Petrol near you?

    DRIVERS are still queuing for petrol at forecourts across the country amid panic buying and shortages at the pumps.

    The government has insisted the fuel crisis is under control but here is how you can help reduce and avoid the traffic jams by finding out if there is petrol near you.

    Apps such as Waze and Google Maps will already show you the fastest route to a destination, including petrol stations.

    Waze previously showed where petrol stations are located along a route and also provides colour coding so you can see the cheapest and most expensive places for fuel near you.

    A green icon indicates the cheapest, red the most expensive and amber in the middle.

    It added a new function this week where its two million users can report on the app how much traffic there is around a petrol station.

    Read more here.

  • Louis Allwood

    Xmas shortages

    Experts have warned that UK consumers could face shortages this Christmas.

    Festive favourites including pigs in blankets and ham could be in short supply due to a lack of butchers, the British Meat Processors Association warned.

    Parents may also struggle to get their hands on sought after presents like toys, bikes, and electronics due to the global shipping crisis.

    Tesco has previously warned there could be panic buying this Christmas if the supply chain crisis isn’t resolved.

    Source: Read Full Article