Twitter suspends US author Naomi Wolf over Covid-19 misinformation

Twitter suspends US author Naomi Wolf for spreading misinformation about Covid vaccines

  • US author Naomi Wolf banned from Twitter after calling Dr Anthony Fauci ‘satan’ 
  • Told her 140,000 followers vaccine passports would ‘start many… genocides’ 
  • Twitter said the suspension would be permanent and Dr Wolf cannot appeal
  • Comes after her latest book, Outrages, was proven factually inaccurate in 2019

Twitter has suspended American author Naomi Wolf after she tweeted myths about Covid-19 vaccines. 

Dr Wolf claimed jabs were a ‘software platform that can receive uploads’ in one tweet and later compared Dr Anthony Fauci, the US’s top Covid advisor, to ‘satan’.

She also tweeted that vaccine passports would ‘recreate a situation that is very familiar to me as a student of history. This has been the start of many, many genocides.’

In another bizarre tweet, Dr Wolf claimed she had spoken to an Apple employee who told her ‘they had new tech to deliver vaccines (with) nanoparticles that let you travel back in time.’

Twitter has suspended American author Naomi Wolf after she tweeted myths about Covid-19 vaccines

The author of ‘The Beauty Myth’ had her account suspended after she repeatedly peddled anti-vaxx theories and compared Dr Anthony Fauci to ‘satan’ on the platform

The author told her 140,000 followers ‘the best way to show respect for healthcare workers if you are healthy and under 65 is to socialise sensibly and expose yourself to a low viral load.’

And in her most recent post, Dr Wolf said ‘it seems urgent for public health to separate vaccinated people’s urine/faeces from general sewage supplies/waterways’ until studies on their potential contamination of unvaccinated people’s drinking water.  

She also claimed children should not wear masks, tweeting the bizarre claim she was ‘seeing kids with their lower faces hanging inertly, absolutely unmoving facial muscles, when they take their masks off’.  

‘No! No!!’ she wrote in response to a picture of a teddy bear ‘helping out at Leamington Spa #vaccination centre as a NHS volunteer steward’. 

And in March, Dr Wolf was duped into posting a fake anti-vaxx quote that she thought was attributed to a doctor, but was in fact said by a porn star. 

‘If a vaccine is effective, then why do you need to pressure people to take it? Informed consent means letting people make their own choices’, the fake quote said. 

Her suspension from the platform was welcomed by other users who said they were pleased to see an end to the ‘dangerous anti-vaxx nonsense’ peddled by Dr Wolf. 

Others said she was the first person to be removed from the platform ‘for being too stupid after giving us gems such as ‘the vaccines let you time travel’, crying that a teddy bear might get a jab, and worrying there might be vaccinated peopel’s urine int he sewage she drinks’. 

Dr Wolf’s suspension from the platform was welcomed by some users who said she had been banned ‘for being too stupid’

Others criticised the suspension, saying it was a result of pressure by the US government and was a restriction on free speech. 

‘How dare you, Twitter. Naomi Wolf raised damn good questions about the rush to and ramifications of mass vax. This is unAmerican silencing of dissent’, one user wrote.

Twitter said the suspension was permanent and Dr Wolf would not be able to launch an appeal. 

Others criticised the suspension, saying it was a result of pressure by the US government and was a restriction on free speech

It is the latest in a string of problematic controversies the American author has faced.

Her book, Outrages: Sex, Censorship, and the Criminalisation of Love, was publicly rubbished in 2019 after a BBC investigation found she had made serious research mistakes and misunderstood key legal terms.

Dr Wolf has also been accused of exaggerating the number of deaths from anorexia in her 1990 book The Beauty Myth and of ‘misrepresenting the brain’ in her book Vaginas. 

She has also claimed the US military imported Ebola from Africa and intended to spread it at home.

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